Sanctions, a Sanctimonious Word For Economic Warfare and Outright Theft

by Ann Garrison, published on Black Agenda Report, March 9, 2022 The U.S. claims the right to sanction, to steal from other nations, with one-third of humanity suffering from these crimes. Sanctions are war by other means and cause great suffering around the world. The word “sanctions” emerged in the Middle Ages, meaning ecclesiastical decrees. Today it’s a sanctimonious word for economic warfare,[…]

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Climate Diplomacy Must Take Africa Into Account

by Howard W. French, published on World Politics Review, November 10, 2021 The standard, “flirting with apocalypse” narrative that dominates U.S. media coverage and political debates regarding climate change goes something like this: China, which is the world’s biggest carbon emitter, and India, which is lightly industrialized and still quite substantially poor, currently represent the biggest threats to saving the[…]

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Was Patrice Lumumba’s Assassination the Most Important of the Last Century?

by Maurice Carney, first published on TRTWorld, August 6, 2018 The assassination was a disaster not only for the Democratic Republic of Congo, but for the entire African continent. More than half a century later, its shockwaves still reverberate. The assassination of Congo’s first democratically elected prime minister, Patrice Emery Lumumba on January 17, 1961 has been famously termed “the[…]

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Addis Ababa and Davos: A Tale of Two Summits

The members of the African Union in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Jan. 28, 2018. by Abayomi Azakiwe, originally published on Workers World Jan 30, 2018 President Donald Trump’s demeaning comments on his preference for northern European immigrants over Africans both on the continent and in the Caribbean indicate the postcolonial crisis in relations between global capitalism and emerging nations in Africa,[…]

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