David vs. Goliath: Nicaragua’s Independence

By Becca Renk, published on Casa Benjamin Linder Website, September 15, 2022 [Español Abajo] This week Nicaragua is celebrating its Independence Days – on September 14th the celebration of the Battle of San Jacinto won against U.S. filibusters in 1856, and on September 15th the commemoration of Central America’s independence from Spain in 1821. At my daughter’s sixth birthday party[…]

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Inside Nicaragua’s Sandinista Revolution: 43 Years Resisting Imperialism

by Benjamin Norton, published on Multipolarista, July 22, 2022 Benjamin Norton reports from inside Nicaragua on the 43rd anniversary of the Sandinista Revolution. This mini-documentary explores the FSLN’s emphasis on social programs, popular participation, anti-imperialism, and internationalism. Transcript LYRICS: This is the war that can’t be held back, the ongoing war against the oppressor. What is the symbol? The people[…]

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Celebrating Revolution in Nicaragua

by Margaret Kimberley, published on Black Agenda Report, July 20, 2022 Holidays in the United States celebrate awful events such as the settler colonists declaring independence from Britain so that they might take indigenous lands and protect slavery. There is also Thanksgiving, the commemoration of genocide turned into a day when Americans should think grateful thoughts before spending more than[…]

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U.S Delegation to Nicaragua Demands ‘End U.S. Sanctions!

by Arjae Red, published on Workers World, January 19, 2022 Managua, Nicaragua:  Members of anti-imperialist organizations from around the U.S. traveled to Nicaragua during the week of Jan. 10 to observe the inauguration of President Daniel Ortega and Vice President Rosario Murillo of the party of the Sandinista National Liberation Front (Frente Sandinista de Liberación Nacional, FSLN). Ortega and Murillo’s[…]

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How Can Some Progressives Get Basic Information about Nicaragua So Wrong?

by John Perry and Rick Sterling, published in the LA Progressive, December 20, 2021 On November 7, Nicaragua held elections in which current president Daniel Ortega received 75% support and, as a result, begins a new term of office in January. Not surprisingly, the US government described the election as a “sham.” Of more concern is that many on the[…]

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Camilo Mejia Analyzes the Soft Coup Attempt in Nicaragua

At the Oakland event, Camilo showed a torture video which demonstrates opposition violence. | Photo: Reuters by Rick Sterling, published on TeleSUR, August 28, 2018 Western media have described the unrest and violence in Nicaragua as a ‘campaign of terror’ by government police and paramilitary. This has also been asserted by large non-governmental organizations (NGOs). In May, for example, Amnesty[…]

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Nicaragua’s Failed Coup

Supporters of Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega, whose resignation is being demanded by opposition students and business leaders. | Photo: Reuters by Charles Redvers, published on Open Democracy, August 9, 2018 While the international pressure continues, by mid-July it became clear that, for the time being at least, the opposition in Nicaragua no longer has sufficient local support to achieve its[…]

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Nicaragua: Dynamics of an Interrupted Revolution

Image from Sandinismo in Nicaragua: Non-State centered alternatives? on Systemic Alternatives by Jeff Mackler, originally published on Socialist Action The unfolding events in Nicaragua over the past three months pose two critical questions for socialists and antiwar activists. Where do we stand on the critical issue of U.S. imperialist intervention and where do we stand with regard to the dynamics[…]

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The Case Against Daniel Ortega

Image: Telesur Live broadcast, July 19. 2540 views at the time this article was 1st published. by Chuck Kaufman, originally posted on The Alliance for Global Justice website, July 25, 2018 The Nicaragua Network/Alliance for Global Justice and I have recently been called Orteguistas (Ortega supporters). We used to be called Danielistas before it became necessary to the narrative to[…]

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